EventStorming; Continuous discovery beyond software modelling

Moving towards a microservices architecture

We see a lot of companies are moving towards a microservice architecture. The big pitfall of microservices architecture is to focus on the technology, how big the microservice needs to be, how many lines of codes, what entities do we put in a microservice, and using rest as the communication between them. But to succeed we need to focus on the problem space, by crunching domain knowledge and do domain modelling. EventStorming is a perfect fit for domain modelling, and almost all the microservices leaders seem to agree. Even ThoughtWorks finally put EventStorming on ‘adopt’ in their most recent rendition of their technology radar. But EventStorming has grown to be more than just a tool for domain modelling and to be successful and create autonomous teams you need to use EventStorming for more than only domain modelling.

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EventStorming and how to monitor Domain Events for product management

We design, model, and create software to solve a problem for our customer (this can also be a customer from within the same company). Only when we do so, we focus naturally on solving the happy path and want to deliver that value as soon as possible. The only problem here is that we will always come to a point where we get corner cases or business exceptions, and the question starts to arise, what shall we do? Is it worth the effort to invest in building a solution for this, or can we leave this function out of the system because it is not worth it? To answer these question, we want, if possible, feedback from the system to know this. We can quickly get this feedback making it explicit in the form of a Domain Event during our EventStorming and start monitoring it. This way we can leave the options open until we know what to do.

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Be carefull using UI Designs as a visual during your BDD refinements

 

The practise of Behaviour Driven Development (BDD), and using tooling to support this like cucumber, has inspired many posts and talks. The recurring questions are predominantly about how teams and people pull these tools out of its collaboration context, and bring it into the test automation context. Cucumber’s post might perhaps be one of the best on this topic,

Last year I started giving talks about BDD based on my own experiences. One pitfall that always seems to pop up, at least in the Netherlands, is about imperative versus declarative (or implementation vs intention).

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